Angel in a Foxhole

Writer Dave Tabar wants to make a movie called Angel in a Foxhole – about Smoky, the Yorkshire Terrier war dog. Until July 4th, Blackpool Records will match all contributions. Here is Dave’s email.

angel in a foxhole - smoky facebook pageSmoky the WWII Dog – Short Film Project Update

96 year old WWII Veteran Bill Wynne needs your help! He has a Yorkie story that must be told –  the incredible and inspirational TRUE story of “Smoky”, his 4 lb. Yorkshire Terrier, who literally became the tiniest Hero of WWII!

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Dave Tabar and Bill Wynne with Yorkie and Smoky photo

Little Smoky was stuck in a foxhole in New Guinea when she was rescued by Bill Wynne’s army regiment.  With Bill by her side, Smoky went on to win an army mascot competition, grace the cover of the GI newspaper, Yank Magazine, become the first-ever Therapy Dog and literally save lives and planes during the war.

Her heart-warming story shows how much our four-legged friends can accomplish and the powerful impact they have on others’ lives, even when they’re only 4 lbs. Little Smoky did not stop there! After the war, she became a celebrity in Cleveland, Ohio and had her own local TV show [WXEL’s Castles in the Air].

smoky-and-bill-wynne-1946
Smoky and Bill Wynne 1946

Help us share her charming place in history as a movie! Please check out our Indiegogo campaign and donate whatever you can – no amount is too small. With your help, 3-time Emmy Award-Winning Director Dean Love can create a memorable short film that will touch all of our hearts and help us convince Hollywood to turn this into a blockbuster feature. Let’s put Smoky’s name in lights and make 96 year old Veteran Bill Wynne’s dream come true!

Hear the story and contribute to the film campaign at Indiegogo – Smoky film.

To all who have helped fund the “Angel in a Foxhole: Smoky the WWII Therapy Dog” short film / Indiegogo campaign: Thank you for your support!

Blackpool Records matches funds until July 4th

We are writing to inform you that we have received a generous offer from Blackpool Records to match all personal donations received during the final days of the campaign, beginning today, to assure that we reach our minimum $25,000 campaign goal!

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John Purdy will play Bill Wynne

Please consider a contribution, no matter how small, to take advantage of this offer. Otherwise, please forward this message to friends, family and others, as the current campaign ends on Wednesday, July 4th. Today we reached 50% of our minimum goal of $25,000 to produce the film that will put “Smoky” on the big screen at selected 2019 short film festivals, as we continue to work toward achieving a full feature film!

STUDIO A FILMS (Cleveland) and DEAN LOVE FILMS (NYC)

Angel in a Foxhole perks, and more about Smoky

wardogs_smoky_wynnephotoCheck out Indiegogo for great perks you get with your donation! If you want to know more about Smoky, see my review of Mr. Wynne’s book Yorkie Doodle Dandy. I also posted about the tribute Australia paid to her, as well as an email I received from Bill Wynne in 2015.

Of course, she is in the Dogs in War post written by Jim Stewart. Smoky’s Facebook page will keep you up to date on the film’s progress as will her website Smoky War Dog.

Fruit Cobbler

rhubarb cobblerIn my never-ending spring search for things to do with rhubarb, I found a Robin Hood Flour cobbler recipe in my recipe scrapbook. A cobbler has fruit on the bottom with a cake-like topping. It looks impressive but is actually quite simple. That’s what you want if, like me, you can’t bake. I found this recipe especially easy.

Bumbleberry Cobbler

fruit-mixture(Bumbleberry just means a mixture of berries and fruit. So I used what I had. Rhubarb, frozen cherries and half a jar of apple butter. I just added it up to the same quantity – 7 cups – of fruit.)

Fruit

4 cups (1 L) thinly sliced peeled apples (or not peeled)
1 cup (250 mL) fresh or frozen strawberries, halved
1 cup (250 mL) fresh or frozen raspberries
1 cup (250 mL) fresh or frozen blueberries
1/2 cup (125 mL) Splenda granular (I used same of sugar)
1/3 cup (75 mL) all purpose flour
1/3 cup (50 mL) orange juice or water

Combine all ingredients. Mix well. Spread in greased 9″ (2.5 L) square cake pan or baking dish.

Topping

1 2/3 cups (400 mL) all purpose flour
2 tbsp (30mL) Splenda granular (I used sugar, same amount)
4 tsp (20 mL) baking powder
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 cup (125 mL) butter
1 cup (250 mL) milk (or buttermilk)

*Combine flour, sweetener, baking powder and salt in mixing bowl.

*Cut in butter with pastry blender (or fork) until mixture is crumbly.

*Add milk, stirring until moistened.

*Drop spoonfuls of batter over fruit, spreading lightly to cover surface.

Place pan on piece of foil (or baking tray) to catch any drips that boil over.

Bake at 400°F (200°C) for 25-30 minutes, or until top is golden. Serve warm. (Especially good with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream on top!)

Tip: Vary the berries to suit your personal taste and what’s in season.

Leaving The Street

This week I only watched Monday’s double episode. I decided at the end of it that I’m leaving the Street. Not forever – I hope. But for now, until something changes that makes it enjoyable for me to watch again.

pvr-screen with watched corrie episodes checkedSince the late 1980s, I’ve watched consistently. I have loved it, and I’ve despaired of it. I’ve suffered through executive producers who were hell-bent on remaking it into something else. I have celebrated when it got back on track. Over those decades, I’ve watched it get more like an American soap. Younger and more beautiful actors taking centre stage. More explosive storylines, more action, less nuance of daily life of regular people. And I’ve stuck with it.

rosie-gemma-and-modelBut the past few months, I’ve more often found myself looking at the clock, wondering if it will be over soon. Looking at the remote, particularly the fast-forward button. Realizing I’m a couple episodes behind, oh dear, when will I be able to catch up. Thinking ‘get off my screen’ about too many characters.

Six episodes

Adding an episode, to six per week, did it for me. Just that extra half hour made watching, keeping caught up, feel like work.pat-points-gun-at-gary

Make time for small moments as well as big stories. That’s what executive producer Kate Oates said they would do with that extra episode. But that’s not what I’ve seen. Scads of new characters, high drama and PSA teaching storylines instead. I’m tired of it. Not any of those things individually, just all of them all the time.

Soap + Crime thriller + Sitcom

wedding-guests-in-bistroMonday’s second episode bounced between three different genres. Crime thriller with Phelan free and threatening again. Soap opera with Robert leaving Michelle and their wedding in the lurch. “Just talk to her, ya plank!” I said, without enthusiasm. So many soap clichés lately, you can’t even care. A sitcom scenario with Rosie, Gemma and somebody new planning the entrapment of somebody else new. (See today’s Scene of the Week for these three scenes.)

Public Service Announcements

shona-and-david-discuss-his-rapeDavid and male rape – a well done and valuable education story, yes. But we haven’t even dealt fully with the suicide and mental health PSA of Aiden. The spectre of grooming and sexual abuse still hovers over Bethany.

robert leaving for londonRobert still has ongoing storylines of a) testicular cancer and b) steroid use. (There’s also Michelle’s Lost and Found sons – straight out of How to Write a Soap Opera.) And remember Billy and his pain-induced heroin use? Has he had a miracle cure for both injury and addiction?

Way too many issues to explore in depth and realistically in terms of the characters’ lives. Plus it’s tiring to watch. Particularly now, when watching the news is a full out emotional rollercoaster ride, Coronation Street would be a nice place to go for a bit of respite.

Leaving for a bit of rest

I don’t think it can feel that much different in the UK than in Canada. Here we have Trump and his bully rants about trade tariffs. In the UK, you have that, as well as Brexit. Exhausting just keeping up. So to also need a score card to keep up with Corrie? No. I can’t do anything about real world politics. But I can control entertainment viewing. If Coronation Street has become as frustrating to watch as the news, it’s time to switch it off.leaving corrie with delete recordings tv screen

I am not advocating that Corrie opt out of the real world and become a bastion of old-fashioned cozy Britain. Just slow down a bit and return to your roots – in both story and storytelling methods. Coronation Street is not a crime drama, sitcom or American soap. It’s not a pulpit or a classroom. It’s a neighbourhood. When it goes back to that, I will be back with bells on!

Corrie Street 17 June 2018

Three Reasons

Three reasons on Monday to leave Coronation Street. Three scenes that too quickly reminded me too much of other types of television shows. So I made a decision that I’ve been thinking about for several months. I stopped watching. I did not watch the rest of the week’s episodes. It feels ok so far, so that’s it. I’m done. You can read more about my overall reasons here.

Crime Drama

reasons to leave - pat-looms-behind-gary-and-sarahA villain returns from the presumed dead. He’s caught, but people underestimate him. They dawdle and don’t pay attention. And surprise, he’s got himself loose and has a gun. Oh no, however will we get out of this alive! It can work – in a crime thriller. If if goes too far, with too many miraculous escapes and close calls, it becomes melodrama. That’s where this has gone.

Soap Opera

robert-leaving-in-vanSomeone sees something and misconstrues it. But that person doesn’t stay to listen to what else is said and therefore get the whole story. Neither does he (Robert) confront, or just ask, anyone about what he overheard. Instead, he goes off in a huff. At a critical juncture. All avoidable if you’d just ask what’s going on. Overused device even in American soaps.

Sitcom

rosie-gemma-and-modelPretty but ditzy women decide to be supersleuths. If they put their heads together, they decide, they can outsmart the bad guy. Hilarity ensues. Because, if they put their heads together, what they got is one big head of good hair. In romance and some mystery novels, this kind of heroine is described as “perky” and/or “sassy.” I don’t read books that use either of those adjectives.

So I’m sorry to say, dear readers, this is the final Scene of the Week. Please feel free to talk amongst yourselves here. I’d love to know what you think. Maybe you can tell me when it’s safe to return.

Justify

Justify belmont-time-nbcsportsA big chestnut colt won the Belmont Stakes on Saturday. Five weeks ago, Justify won the Kentucky Derby. Three weeks ago, he won the Preakness. So he won the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred horse racing. It’s the second Triple Crown in three years, also second Triple Crown in forty years.

The jockey of another big chestnut colt was there watching Justify baffert-greets-ron-turcotte-2018 belmont stakes-nbcsportsdo it. Ron Turcotte could see the blue and white pole at the side of the track. It is 31 lengths from the finish line, marking the distance by which he and Secretariat won the 1973 Belmont, and the Triple Crown. No horse ever has matched that margin (76 metres) or Secretariat’s track record time.

Secretariat-pole-2018-Belmont-nbcsports
Frontrunners passing Secretariat pole 2018 Belmont Stakes

But Justify won the extraordinarily long race, at 1 1/2 miles, wire to wire. He was first out of the gate, and he kept his lead. For what felt like a long, long time, all the other horses were keeping up with him, just back a bit. Keeping up but not increasing their speed. Still, I was terrified. Someone was going to go into overdrive somewhere in that last half- or quarter-mile. “Pull him back, Mike, he’s got to save something for the stretch.”

Justify 1st, Gronkowski last to 2nd

gronkowski-last-2018-nbcMike Smith knows more about riding horses than I do. Justify did have something left. He pulled ahead a bit right near the end, finishing 1 3/4 lengths ahead of Gronkowski. That order of finish was a total surprise. Gronkowski was a long shot who wasn’t even near the pack for much of the race. And then he flew past horses to the front, almost. If you’d bet that unlikely combination, you’d have made some real money.2018-belmont-official-results-nbcsports

Justify is the 13th horse to win the Triple Crown in its 99 year history. His name and silks join theirs in the small field at Belmont Park honouring the winners. The silks of red with yellow stars justify 2018-triple-crown-plaque-nbcbelong to the China Horse Club, co-owners of Justify. In the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, he wore the colours of WinStar Farms, the other owners in the partnership.

With luck, we’ll see Justify run again this year. Maybe the Travers Stakes at Saratoga in August and the Breeders’ Cup in November at Churchill Downs. In 2015 American Pharoah won the Breeders’ Cup but finished behind Keen Ice in the Travers.

Justify_2018_Belmont_Stakes-Mike-Lizzi-wikicommonsjpgJustify is the son of Scat Daddy and Stage Magic. He has a lot of Northern Dancer in him, through both parents. 1977 Triple Crown winner Seattle Slew is his mother’s great-great-grandsire. A  Man_o_War_winning_Belmont-1920-wikipedia chestnut big redgeneration back from there on his dad’s side, there’s Big Red, Secretariat. Another few generations back and you’ll see the original Big Red, the big chestnut champion Man o’ War.

Corrie Street 10 June 2018

Stag

Robert’s stag do in Wednesday’s episode. Less than a handful of guys who don’t know Robert all that well gathered in the Rovers in mid-afternoon. On its own, a bit lame, even seeming a bit shoehorned in. But in costume? That was the straw that broke the camel’s back.five stag guys

There was a warning signal just before. Ryan told Steve – there’s a theme, come as a pop star. A heads up for the audience too. It might be good, some of them have been, I told myself. But events involving themed fancy dress have become somewhat of a Corrie trope.

The highlight, I suppose, was Michelle’s warring sons each coming as an Oasis Gallagher brother, in identical costumes. Totally coincidentally, according to Ali and Ryan when they saw the other. Oh sure, makes sense to independently choose to dress up as one of an always-linked warring duo.connor-brothers-as-gallagher

I restrained myself from turning off the television. Watch the rest of the episode, I told myself, can’t be too hasty.

Next episode, the hen party arrived. They too were in themed costumes. I’m not sure what the theme was, or what the costumes were for that matter. Michelle or Carla said, but I missed it. I was too busy trying to figure out their costumes. And I couldn’t muster the enthusiasm to rewind and watch again. Maybe it was Robert?

jenny-dressed-as-robertI did catch Jenny telling Robert that his suit looked better on her. His suit? It fit her perfectly, and she’s half the size of him. What’d she do, stop at Underworld and recut and resew it?

Another need to restrain myself. Watch to the end of the episode. Watch to the end of the week. See how you feel. So I did, and felt the same way. Coronation Street has become too crazy. Watching is too much work.

Where’s Aiden?

Meanwhile, poor Aiden still isn’t buried! His funeral hasn’t even been discussed. I’ve lost track of how many episodes now equal one steve-as-boy-georgeWeatherfield day but it has to have been long enough to have him cleared for burial. He was mentioned a few times. Good thing too because I’d actually forgotten all about him. It feels like ages ago that he killed himself. It’s only been two weeks.

Terrenceville Mi’kmaq

Guest post by Devon Griffin

Esther-Mary-Myles-Mitchell
Esther (Myles) Mitchell

This story is about Terrenceville, Fortune Bay, about 140 years ago. It was told to the late Esther Mary Cox by her grandmother and namesake, Esther Mary (Myles) Mitchell. Mrs. Cox passed the story on to Calvin Hackett when he interviewed her many decades ago. Mr. Hackett and Sheila Parsons Cox told me the story, and it’s one of my favourites. I’ve changed nothing of what they told me, other than to add a bit of context.

Esther Myles (1861-1927) married Michael Mitchell, born Dec. 1845 in Burin. They had seven children.

Summer visits to Terrenceville

Years ago in the summer, during much simpler times, the entire Conne River Mi’kmaq band would travel from Bay d’Espoir down Fortune Bay to stay in Terrenceville. From there, they travelled across the Burin Peninsula to hunt in areas such as Swift Current and Sandy Harbour. In Terrenceville they camped at a place called “River Garden”. It was at the end of the “The Meadow,” close to a barachois called Koskaecodde by the Mi’kmaq ancients.

Terrenceville-photo-Calvin-Hackett
Terrenceville, showing barachois crossing the bay from townsite at mid-right (click to enlarge)

Some of these Mi’kmaq visitors eventually stayed in Terrenceville. They intermarried with European families and have many descendants in the area today.

Esther Mary Myles was the daughter of a European settler family in Terrenceville. She was born about 1861 to Elizabeth and Robert Myles (or Miles). When a young girl, she played with the visiting Mi’kmaq children. They developed strong friendships despite cultural differences and being apart much of each year. The years passed and they became young women, but they all remained close friends.

“Do up on them”

One summer in the late 1870s or early 1880s, the Mi’kmaq camped as usual at the “River Garden”, at the home of a Mi’kmaq man named Joseph Saunders.

The-Meadow-Terrenceville
The strip of land across the bay was called “The Meadow.” The “River Garden” was at the top.

Esther overheard the adult white people say that they had planned to attack the Mi’kmaq at the encampment. They wanted to drive them out of the area. Realizing the seriousness of this, Esther didn’t search out her female friends. Instead she went directly to the camp of their chief. She entered his tent, sat down and explained what she had heard. The men from the area were going to “do up on them,” she told him. Esther pleaded for him and his tribe to take up their camps and leave.

See, at that time, the European settlers were upset that the Mi’kmaq would come every year and take away ‘their’ hunt. The Europeans considered the Mi’kmaq to be stealing from them. This, despite the fact the Mi’kmaq had been hunting in the area for much longer than any Europeans had lived there.

Esther pleaded that their leaving would eliminate the pending danger to all. The chief’s first response to Esther was silence. But then he withdrew his large hunting knife. Still silent, the chief began to cut off portions of every different kinds of fresh meat that he had. Next, he placed the meat into a bag and passed it over to her, in appreciation.

Early next morning, Esther’s first thought was to check the meadow from her house window. She was overwhelmed to see that there was not a sign of a tent left on the meadow. Her Indian friends had moved on before the first hint of daylight. Not long after, it was reported that the Mi’kmaq were seen paddling up the bay.Terrenceville_Newfoundland-panoramio-2010-ColleenMartin

No more visits

From that point on, they no longer visited the area. The ones who stayed had already intermarried with the Europeans, so today their descendants make up the new Mi’kmaq of the area. Those Europeans who had differences with the Mi’kmaq are long gone, and over 95% of Terrenceville now is of Mi’kmaq descent.

Mrs. Mitchell, her granddaughter Esther said, was very proud of this story. She always remembered with great affection her Mi’kmaq friends who departed all those years before.

bay-despoir-to-terrenceville
Bay d’Espoir at left, to Terrenceville marked with red pointer. Thanks, Google maps.

See Fortune Bay NL (May 5/17) also written by Devon as well his follow-up to it, Fortune Bay mtDNA (June 1/18).

Click or tap images in this post for a larger view (except the photo of Mrs. Mitchell, already at full size).

Corrie Street 3 June 2018

Royal Weddings

rita-and-liz-and-gemma-in-kabin - royal weddings talkThe chat in the Kabin on Wednesday about royal weddings and coronations. Liz and Rita remembering, Gemma trying desperately to remember her history lessons in school. Very funny.

Liz and Rita explained to Gemma that Coronation rita-remembers-1953-coronationStreet was renamed in 1902 for the coronation of Edward VII. Rita told Gemma that television existed in 1953 so they could watch Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation. She heaved a sigh of exasperation at Gemma’s explanation for not knowing that because she didn’t know anything about “Victorian times”.

charles-and-diana-weddingRita and Liz reminisced about the other big Royal wedding they watched years back. That of Charles and Diana. Gemma was straining, trying to keep track of the who’s who. She and Rita both looked flummoxed when Liz proudly said she credited Diana’s example for developing her own fashion sense.

I had hoped they would not ignore the wedding of Harry and Meghan. They had done such a good job commemorating William gemma and rita-react-to-liz-on-fashion-influenceand Kate’s. It worked in nicely with other storylines at the time, about reasons for marriage. The nod to Harry and Meghan’s wedding was more a small interlude between ongoing stories.

And the good Lord knows we needed it! At least I did. All the pots were on full boil this week.

Week’s events

We’ve got the Connors still dealing with Aiden’s suicide. Early in the week, Johnny lashing out at Jenny then trying to make sense of what happened – perfect. Gut-wrenching and thought-provoking. And then it got crowded out by too much else.

  • Summer and Billy’s PSA-type campaign fund-raiser for a “Speak and Save” hotline for men. (In their royals chat, Gemma mentions “the interview,” about Heads Together presumably)
  • Kate, wanting to get wasted with friends, and ending up with a guy attacking them. Then in the course of saving Kate and Rana from him, Zeedan nearly killed the guy. Now they’re trying to hide their involvement.
  • Eileen came back, so Pat Phelan is lurking around too.
  • Abi started work at the garage, so heroin addiction is likely to return somehow. So too is a jealous Fiz.
  • The threat of Ryan, Michelle’s non-bio-son, returning for her wedding. NO!!!!
  • At the week’s end, it looks like Robert is having a heart attack.

This makes a three ring circus look like watching paint dry. And we haven’t even buried poor Aiden yet.

Friday, Alya to Zeedan: “It’s big, it’s gonna take time.” Words of wisdom for the writers here. Just throwing all the spaghetti at the wall at once doesn’t allow time to savour and digest each strand.

rita-says-diana-so-elegantAfter watching it, I expected I’d choose Johnny’s outburst at Jenny as my scene. But at end of the week, all that still stood out for me was Liz, Rita and Gemma talking about royal weddings.

Fortune Bay mtDNA

A guest post by Devon Griffin

Mary Park Brooks

John G. Edgar provided me with details of Mary Park Brooks from his research.  She was born about 1758 in the Burin area, according to 1838 List of Inhabitants of the Bay of Islands. Her birth family name is unknown. She first married Robert Park. Their children included Mary, James Charles, Richard, Thomas, Robert and John. There are possibly other children, including Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Beverley. Mary Park’s second husband was John Brooks, a widower, and they had no children together.

Mary-Ann-Payne-gr-granddaughter-of-Mary-Park-Brooks
Mary Ann Payne, great-grandchild of Mary Park Brooks

Descendants of Mary Park Brooks maintain she was of Mi’kmaq origin, and several records describe her descendants as being native. Recently an mtDNA test was conducted, with a family history verified by several local genealogists including Mr. Edgar. It shows that her maternal line matches that of Elizabeth (Joe) Blanchard, Elizabeth Saunders, and several known ancestral Mi’kmaq women. This indicates she is a close relative to these women, possibly a sister, aunt or other maternal relation.

Charlotte Jeddore Cox

Charlotte-Jeddore-Cox mtDNA testsCharlotte (Jeddore) Cox was born about 1825 in Conne River to Mi’kmaq parents. A young Frederick Cox was working in Bay d’Espoir in the logging industry and met Charlotte. Against her parents wishes, Charlotte moved away to the Burin area with Frederick and married him. She took the name of her neighbours, the Riggs, in Creston South, Burin to apparently hide from her family. She may have changed her first name also, to Charlotte.

It isn’t completely clear why her parents didn’t approve of her marriage to Frederick Cox. Some of their descendants say that some of her older brothers found her, in her new life, sometime in the late 1800s. However there are conflicting stories of what happened as a result of this skirmish.

Charlotte and Frederick had several children, and their descendants live on today along the Burin Peninsula and elsewhere. Charlotte’s mtDNA test has been completed. It shows that she shares the same maternal line as Elizabeth (Joe) Blanchard, Elizabeth Saunders and Mary Parks Brooks, all ancestral Mi’kmaq women.

Mary Josephine Brown Murphy

As stated in my first article on Fortune Bay, Mary Josephine was born 1854 and married John Murphy. Their children were known as Mi’kmaq. They grew up in wigwams or tilts around the Piper’s Hole area, before moving to St. Joseph’s and Parker’s Cove along the Burin Peninsula.

The results of a recent mtDNA test confirm Mary Josephine’s maternal line arises from northern Eurasia, which would be modern day Siberia and Scandinavia. This could point to the direct maternal line being Native American as Natives travelled from Siberia to North America. There are no matches to the mtDNA test. So until another full sequence mtDNA match from Newfoundland appears, it is not known who her relatives were due to an absence of records.

SAUNDERS FAMILY UPDATE

There may have been another Saunders sibling, child of John & Elizabeth Saunders. A few years ago, I found an adult baptism in the RC Church in Burin for a Mary Saunders in 1837. Her sponsors were people from Terrenceville (then Fortune Bay Bottom). Being that there was only one Saunders couple in the area at the time, this seemed peculiar.

I could not find what happened to Mary or who she was, however, until now. A great great granddaughter of a James and Mary Hare of Burgeo completed a DNA test. Her results matched several descendants of the Saunders family out of Fortune Bay, as cousins. Through further analysis, this was undoubtably a Saunders relation. The Hare family had come from Fortune Bay, Belleoram area specifically, prior to living in Burgeo. Mary, wife of James Hare, was born about 1821 and passed away on April 26 1908 in Burgeo. They had several children and have many descendants across Canada.

In 1925 Joseph Small completed his diary of Burgeo which detailed the families in the area. Joseph Small believed that Ann Saunders (daughter of John and Elizabeth) who married Esau Rhymes had come from Fortune Bay with the Hare family. This further displayed the probability that Mary Hare was a Saunders. It’s likely the two sisters, Ann and Mary, came to Burgeo together from Fortune Bay. An mtDNA test for a direct female descendant of Mary is being worked on to confirm this theory. So if anyone has any information on this Hare family, please comment below!

FUTURE mtDNA RESEARCH

An mtDNA test is currently in process for a direct female descendant of Ellen (Unknown) Hollett. She married William Hollett (b.1786) and lived on Woody Island, Placentia Bay. Ellen is suspected to have been of Mi’kmaq origin. However, as of yet there is no proof. Autosomal DNA has pointed towards a relation to the Saunders family. An mtDNA test will be interesting to see for more of this story. I have been told that a Hollett descendant has a two page lexicon of words from an unknown aboriginal group. It’s possibly a connection to the Beothuk tribe.

The Smith (of Argentia) and Salmon (of Long Harbour) families are next to be tested. Their Mi’kmaq origins are likely to be discovered.

ANCIENT MI’KMAQ VILLAGE IN PLACENTIA BAY

In 1680, a French report on the topography and hydrography of Placentia Bay and the South Coast of Newfoundland had noted a Mi’kmaq village near Placentia that was occupied by a group of about 240 Mi’kmaq… The report went on to identify another Mi’kmaq village of two hundred people that was situated on the south coast of Newfoundland, a little further west of Placentia.

The Placentia Area: A changing mosaic – Lee Everts 2016:47

new-voyages-to-north-amer-lahontan-1703
Placentia Bay – New Voyages to North America, 1703, Louis Armand de Lom d’Arce, baron de Lahontan (tap to enlarge a bit)

Everts cites M. G. (Jerry) Wetzel’s 1995 LLM thesis for this 1680 reference to south coast Mi’kmaq villages. It may well be that the latter, west of Placentia, is Miawpukwek. The former, “near Placentia”, is not as readily identifiable but it could mean it’s in the Burin area or anywhere in Placentia Bay.

Could the Park, Saunders, Jeddore, Joe, and Brown ancestors have all originated out of this village? Mary Parks Brooks was only born 75-80 years after the date of this French report. So it wouldn’t be a stretch to connect her to this community. She was from the Burin area, after all. We also know that the Bernard, John and Barrington families as well as many others frequented the area of Pipers Hole and Upper Placentia Bay in the 1800s.

Also see 2nd part by Devon,  Terrenceville Mi’kmaq (June 8/18), a story about Esther Mary (Myles) Mitchell