Tag Archives: Bertie Township

Frederick Anger, Welland or Wisconsin

The History of the County of Welland, Ontario: Its past and present 1887

county of welland title pageJames E. Anger, publisher and proprietor of the Niagara Falls Review, and Rev. William H. Anger, principal and originator the St. Catherines Business College, are members of one of the oldest families in the county of Welland.

Two brothers named Anger, (or Ahinger) came from Germany at an early date and settled at a place called Clobrock, N.Y. Both fought for the British Crown during the revolutionary war, and when General Washington finally triumphed, they, with the Nears, (German, Neher) Hoffmans and other Loyalists, came to Canada, bringing with them what they could with ox teams.

Augustus Anger settled near Dunnville; John Charles Anger in Bertie, and had three sons, Augustus, John Charles and Frederick. The last named died a bachelor. Augustus married and has many descendants now living in the county. John Charles married Abigail Near in Bertie in 1787 – just one hundred years ago.

In 1812, both John Charles and his eldest son took up arms in support of the British Government, and participated in the battle of Chippawa. The son, named Frederick, who had located in Wisconsin, came to Canada to battle for the land and flag of his fathers, returning after the war to Wisconsin.

The old homestead was the farm now owned by John Miller, Bertie, on the Ridge road. Of the sons of J. C. Anger, all went west except William C. and Henry C. The former resided near Ridgeway, the latter, who was born in 1801, remained on the old homestead, willed him by his father, until his death in 1877. Of H. C. Anger’s descendants, two sons and two daughters yet survive, James E. and William H., whose names head this sketch, and Mrs. E. Augustine, of Humberstone, and Mrs. W. J. Brown, of Port Robinson.

James E. Anger started the Niagara Falls Review in 1879, and has succeeded in establishing a permanent and paying business. His wife is Martha, daughter of Thomas Spedding of Bertie.

William H. Anger, after being associated with his brother in the publishing business at Niagara Falls for some years, started the Niagara Falls Business College, removing it to St. Catherines in 1885, and changing the name to suit the new location. The institution is rapidly winning a wide reputation for success and efficiency in fitting the young for the practical business of life. It is fitted with telegraphic, banking and other facilities. Mr. Anger is well qualified for the work he has undertaken, being a B. A. of Albert College. His wife is Hattie A., daughter of James S. Dell, Esq., of Willoughby.

excerpt Biographical Sketches, Niagara Falls Town, 506-507
history of welland county pp 506-507
Click image for larger view, or here to read or download text

So, according to this writer in 1887, John Charles Anger’s son Frederick never married and had no children. He moved to the USA, returned to fight on Canada’s side in the War of 1812, then went back to Wisconsin.

But other sources say John Charles Anger’s son Frederick (1791-1857) married Elizabeth Thompson (1820-1850). They had maybe six children: Phoebe, Robert, Margaret, Silby, Catherine and Elizabeth. Parents and children were born in Ontario. All children but one died in Ontario. No mention of Wisconsin.

This source is 130 years closer to the people and events than we are. So I believe the author. However, grave information and land records suggest that Frederick Anger, son of John Charles Anger and Abigail Near, lived his life in Ontario with wife and children.

Two different Fredericks? Confusion of generations of John Charles Angers? If anyone can explain this, please do! Thanks, Jim Flock, for pointing out this inconsistency.

(The Biographical Sketches of History of Welland County is in ‘Biographies 1887’ below.)

William Anger and Emma Nie

William Anger Emma Nie 70th anniversary 110

(William Anger and Emma Nie 1958, text below, click image to enlarge)

Their Wedding 70 Years Ago

Two lifelong residents of this district will be celebrating the 70th anniversary of their wedding day this week.

Mr. and Mrs. William Anger, 19 Buchanan Avenue, who were married 70 years ago on December 6, will be observing the occasion on Christmas day quietly at home surrounded by members of their family.

Both 89 years of age, Mr. and Mrs. Anger were born in South Cayuga, Mrs. Anger being the former Emm Nie, and were married in Dunnville at the home of the Rev. F. L. Wilkinson. They came to Hamilton in 1903 and for many years made their home on Ottawa Street South before moving to their present address.

Mr. Anger, who has done farming most of his life, retired 20 years ago. He still takes an active interest in the chores about the house and spends much of his spare time reading and keeping up on world events.

Of their family, still living are two sons, Harvey and Charles, this city, and five daughters: Mrs. Archie Lickers (Grace) and Mrs. Joseph Smith (Emmeline) both of Buffalo, and Mrs. Charles Alexander (Hazel), Mrs. Wilfred Moore (Myrtle) and Mrs. Lorne Forbes (Florence) Hamilton.

There are 27 grandchildren and 65 great-grandchildren.

Photo caption: “Mr. and Mrs. William Anger look at their framed marriage certificate, dated 1888, Dunnville.” (Newspaper date Dec. 1958)

***My thanks to Barry Patterson for sending me this clipping***

Their Family History

William Charles Anger was the son of Edward Anger and Emaline Bowden. He was born in 1869 in Byng, Dunn Township, Haldimand Co. Ontario and died in 1964 in Hamilton, Ontario.  His wife Emma was born in 1871 in Rainham, Haldimand Co. Ontario, and died in 1960 in Hamilton. She was the daughter of Martin Nie (or Nye) and Wilhemina Hausp. Martin was born in 1830 in South Cayuga, Haldimand Co. Ontario. Wilhemina was born in 1852 in the US. They married in 1867 in Wyandott City in Kansas. They raised their family in Haldimand County and Hamilton, Ontario.

Emma Nie and William Anger had nine children, with seven named in the article. Two sons predeceased them. William was the eldest, born Jan 1893 in Dunville, Haldimand County. He married Amy Mildred Chappel Nov. 21st 1917 in Englefield, Saskatchewan. She was born in 1896 in Morden, Manitoba. Their five children were born in Saskatchewan, but the family returned to Ontario. Amy died in 1944 and William in 1953, both in Hamilton. William and Emma’s fourth child, Halton, was born August 1898 in Dunnville.

James Burwell UEL

Confused by many men centuries ago named Samuel, Adam, John and James Burwell in my database, I gave up trying to sort them out. I then picked up my mother’s family history binder. It pays to do that occasionally. So here is a letter from the late Lloyd Burwell to my mother about their mutual great-great-grandfather James Burwell UEL. Also included is information on James’ brothers and father and possible connection to the Virginia Burwells. I removed only small parts not relevant to family history in my transcription.

lloyd-burwell-1983-pg131 July 1983

Dear Ruby, …

I am sending you a copy of the obituary of James Burwell as you requested. I am also sending you copies of several other items…

Upper Canada Land Petitions

The list I made of the Upper Canada Land Petitions from PAC in Ottawa includes our ancestor James Burwell (No. 1 and 12) and our ancestor Lewis Burwell (No. 8). The others are the other sons and daughters of James (brothers and sisters of Lewis). The list of Upper Canada Land Grants on the same page includes James (No. 1) and Lewis (No. 10). I have copies of all the petitions and grants in these lists.

I have included copies of the Land Grants for Lewis (Warrant 3855) and James (Fiat 2347) together with the Certificate signed by Col. Talbot certifying that James Burwell had completed his settlement duties 2nd July 1819. I have also included a copy of the survey for Lot 13 North, Talbot Road East Branch. By the assignment recorded on Warrant 3855 it is evident that Lewis did not take up his Crown Grant. Instead he sold his right to a land agent by the name of James Anderson.

I had first seen the Biographical Sketch of James Burwell by Lorenzo Sabine (p 277) back in 1974 and wondered where he got his information. Two years ago I found out when Wm. Yeoger, curator of the Eva Brook Donly Museum in Simcoe, published the results of his searching old newspaper records at the Ontario Archives (OA) including the obituary of James Burwell reported in the Church of England paper “The Church”.

When vacationing in New Brunswick

When vacationing in New Brunswick in 1976 we visited Esther Clarke Wright in her home. She listed James Burwell in her book The Loyalists of New Brunswick among some 6000 Loyalists she had researched. She is a PhD; a retired professor of history from Acadia University in Wolfville NS. I did not get any new information from her.

I also went to the Dept. of Lands & Mines in Fredericton NB to look at the original Crown land grand maps. I did not find a reference to a specific lot but did get a copy of the land grant to the Regiment of 38,450 acres and reference to James Burwell being entitled to 250 acres. I believe he sold his right to his officer, Captain John Borberie.

At the PAC in Ottawa

At the Public Archives of Canada (PAC) in Ottawa I researched through microfilms of the British Military Records and ordered copies of all the Muster Rolls that listed James Burwell. I made a list (copy enclosed) of the ones I found. James Burwell had a brother Samuel and his father’s name was also Samuel. Since there is a Samuel Burwell listed on some of the Muster Rolls, we can speculate that it may be James’ brother or father.

William D. Reid (now dead) was an archivist at O.A. On p. 43 of his book “The Loyalists in Ontario” he lists James Burwell and his 10 sons and daughters who received Crown Grants of land. Actually there was an eleventh child, Timothy, but there is no evidence that he applied for or received a Crown Grant.

I am enclosing a photocopy of the monument in Fingal cemetery near the east gate having inscriptions on three faces for 1, Lewis Burwell, 2, his wife Levonia Williams and 3, Laura A. Kennedy. I transcribed Laura’s year of death as 1881 but have since found her mother Amy [d/o Lewis and Levonia] age 25 in the 1881 census so Laura, being age 15 at death, must have died in 1891.

I am enclosing a photocopy of a 1908 newspaper clipping I found in a scrap book at the O.A. about Levonia Burwell, wife of Lewis. Lewis died at age 42. Did you ever hear what the cause of death was?

Mahlon and James Burwell 1st cousins 1 remove

I am enclosing copies of p. 327 and 328 from Vol II July 1920 of Tyler’s Quarterly Historical & Genealogical Magazine. The chart supplied by Mr. Raymond W. Smith of Orange NJ shows our ancestor James as being a first cousin of Col. Mahlon Burwell. Maria Burwell who married Howard Johnson spoke of Mahlon Burwell being a cousin of her father Lewis [s/o James and Hannah]. According to this chart they would be 1st cousins once removed.

lloyd-burwell chart1 James BurwellI am also enclosing a photocopy of a 1935 newspaper account of the celebration of Maria Burwell’s 100th birthday. I believe I copied it from a clipping owned by Gertrude Bowes of New Liskeard, Ont.

I am enclosing photocopies of the last two pages of a 16 page article by Archibald Blue in 1899 about Col. Mahlon Burwell. He quotes Lorenzo Sabine in the Biographical Note with reference to James Burwell, then states that his relationship to Adam Burwell, the father of Mahlon, is uncertain. I have a copy of Adam Burwell’s petition for land which Archibald Blue states “appears to be lost”. The record is with the Upper Canada Land Petitions at PAC in Ottawa.

USA to Bertie Township

In James Burwell’s 1811 petition for land (Vol 37 B10/24) he states that he sent his brother (not named) with his cattle and goods from Presque Isle on the south side of Lake Erie to Upper Canada on or about the 1st day of July 1798 and that he arrived with his family in the Township of Bertie on or before the twelfth of July 1798. It would appear that the date 1796 stated in James Burwell’s obituary and all subsequent quotes by others is in error. Adam Burwell also affirms (he was a Quaker at the time) that James Burwell’s cattle and goods were brought to his farm in Bertie about the 19th of July 1798.

No mention is made of the relationship of James to Adam. Adam Burwell came to Upper Canada 12 years earlier than James, i.e. in 1786. He had been a spy for the British during the Revolution.

I am enclosing photocopies of the 10 pages of genealogy of the Burwell family of Virginia as recorded in Colonial Families of the Southern United States of America. It is Edward Burwell identified as 2-6 at the bottom of the 1st page (p. 94) that is referred to following the chart in Tyler’s Quarterly on p. 328.

Lewis Burwell family Bible

Mr. McDermott who lives in Fort Erie, Ont. is the present owner of the family bible of Lewis Burwell of Brantford, the surveyor and younger brother of Col. Mahlon Burwell. I have photocopies of all the family information recorded in this bible.

Lewis, writing in the bible in 1837, states that about the year 1607 or 1610 his great-grandfather Edward Burwell was named in a Royal Charter to a Plantation Company, who came from the city of London to the Province of Virginia. He states that his great-grandfather’s son John who married Agnes Lee removed from Virginia to the Province of New Jersey. He states that his grandfather John had several sons and the youngest son was his father Adam who married Sarah Vail, daughter of Nathaniel Vail of New Jersey. Also in this bible Lewis records the death of James Burwell, a cousin who died at Port Talbot on 25th June 1853 aged 99 years and 5 months.

Our ancestor John Burwell

I find it hard to believe that our ancestor John Burwell who is said to have left Jamestown, Virginia in 1721 would be the son of Edward Burwell who was in Virginia in 1648. John Burwell is believed to have been born in 1705 and Edward in 1625. This would make Edward 80 years old when John was born. It seems to me there should be another generation in between.

lloyd-burwell-1983-pg7Well I think this is enough genealogy for one letter.  I trust it will all be of interest to you…

Your (2nd) cousin,

Lloyd Burwell

Also see my Burwells in US & Canada. I will post the papers referred to above in a photo gallery or post format.

G. Frederick Anger UEL

painting by Jasper Francis Cropsey C19th Wyoming Valley PAIn colonial times [Georg] Frederick Anger, a native of Germany, lived on the Susquehannah River in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. During the American Revolution he joined Butler’s Rangers at Fort Niagara. Following the war, Frederick Anger settled in Bertie Township, Welland County. The following is his Claim for Revolutionary War Losses heard by the Commissioners of Claims at Niagara on 23 Aug 1787. (AO 12 Vol. 40 P. 335-338)*

To the Commissioners appointed by Act of Parliament for enquiring into the Losses and Services of the American Loyalists:

Loyalist-Settlers-Niagara-Falls-Library-nflibrary.ca_nfplindex_The Memorial of Frederick Anger late of Susquehannah River in the County of Northumberland and Province of Pennsylvania but now of Niagara in the Province of Quebec.

Humbly Sheweth:

* That your Memorialist, at the beginning of the late unhappy Disturbances in America, was settled on the North Branch of the Susquehannah River in Northumberland County Province of Pennsylvania where he was in possession of a good Farm with Buildings thereon erected, live Stock, Farming utensils, Household Furniture etc., the whole valued at £372.18, New York Currency;

* That understanding Parliament had taken into Consideration the distressed State of the Loyal American Subjects and purpose granting them such relief as may appear Just and Reasonable in proportion to their Losses;

Your Memorialist in behalf of himself and Family humbly prays that you will be pleased to grant him such Relief as may appear Reasonable and your Memorialist shall ever pray.

State of the Effects lost by Frederick Anger late of Northumberland County in the Province of Pennsa. at the time he made his Escape to the British Army in the year 1778, from which period till the Close of the War he served the King in Colonel Butler’s Rangers –  300 Acres of Land, Cattle, Grain, Hogs,Household Furniture, Farming utensils etc.,£372.18 New York Currency.

August 27th 1787

Evidence on the Claim of Frederick Anger late of Pennsylvania

Claimant Sworn,
Says he is a native of Germany, went to America 30 years ago. Lived on the Susquhannah when the Rebellion broke out, joined Colonel Butler, served Seven years with him as a Private. He had two Sons in the same Regiment.

He had half a Proprietor’s Right on the disputed Lands on the Susquhannah, gave 72 Dollars for it, his half Right was 2000 acres. Says he went to Susquhannah in 1772. Cleared 20 Acres. Built a good House and Stable.

Lost 4 Cows, 3 Horses, 3 three year old Heifers, 2 two year old, 3 Calves, 7 Sheep, 14 Hogs large one, Furniture, utensils, 60 Bushels Grain, 80 Bushels various kinds of Corn – all lost by the Indians and Rangers.

Michael Showers Sworn,
Knew Claimant, he served in Butlers Rangers from the time that the Susquhannah was cut off by Colonel Butler. He [Anger] had Lands on the Susquehannah. He had half a Proprietors Right, it was then disputed Land. He had a clever House and Barn, about 20 Acres clear, he settled there about 1772. He had a pretty large Stock, taken by the Indians and Rangers.

Decision of the Commissioners

(AO 12 Vol. 66 P. 56)
Frederick Anger late of Susquehanah
Claim
Amount of Property £723.7.6
Determination 7th December 1787
Loyalty. Bore Arms – The Claimant is a Loyalist & Bore Arms in Support of the British Government

Losses.
Real Estate: Improvements on a Farm on the Susquehanah – £35
Personal Estate:  Various Articles of Personal Property 42 – £77
Loss Proved
Resides at Niagara
Summary of Claim for Losses and Disbursement
(AO 12 Vol. 109 P. 74 Certificate No. 915)

Name of claimant: Anger, Frederick; Province Penns; Claim for Loss of Property £723.7; Sum Originally Allowed £77; Total Sum payable under Act of Parliament £77; Balance After Such Receipt £77; Final Balance £77

The Second Report of The Bureau of Archives for the Province of Ontario, 1904 transcribed from Library of Congress MSS 18,662 Vol. XX MSS. 41 in Second Report P. 973 Proceedings of Loyalist Commissioners, Montreal 1787.

Bertie Township Map 1784 includes G. Frederick Anger land
Click image to enlarge

Before Commissioner Pemberton P. 973 MSS. 41. New Claim Aug. 23. Claim of Frederick Anger, late of Pensylva. Repeats the evidences in AO 12.

* I thank Phillip Schettler for this (Apr. 24/14 comment Anger family tree).  For more information on UEL claims and compensations, see Alexander Fraser‘s United Empire Loyalists, 2nd Report of the Bureau of Archives of the Province of Ontario 1904. 

The map of Bertie Township shows names of land owners in 1784. I have marked those lots belonging to Angers in yellow, Nears (early in-laws) in orange. The lots of my other family lines, the Mabees are marked in green and Adam Burwell’s in blue.

Anger by name…

Years ago, I was in a public library in Los Angeles and found reference books on family Massacre of the Vaudois of Merindol from Wikipediahistories.  I looked up my family name, Anger.  It said the name came from France, from the region of Anjou, with its main city being Angers.  I was thrilled with the idea of being French.

When I came home, I told my father.  He said “French!  No!  We’re German.”  He had always said when asked that he didn’t know the family origins – “a little bit of everything” was his answer.  So I remained convinced that we were French.

Much later, when I started delving into family history and found other family members doing the same, I discovered that Dad and I were both right.

A French and German family name

The family was Huguenot or French Protestant.  In the 16th and 17th centuries, Protestants in France had to convert to Catholicism or be killed or expelled.  Or they fled the country.  They went to Protestant countries, among them the territories that became Germany.  And that is where the known history of our family starts.

Butlers-Rangers signage at Ottawa-War-MuseumGeorg Frederick Anger migrated to Pennsylvania in 1754. When the American colonies went to war with Britain, George Frederick chose the British side and he and his sons fought as Loyalists to the crown.  After the war, they moved across the new border and settled in Bertie Township, near Fort Erie.  They joined Butler’s Rangers, a British regiment made up of Loyalists.

The Anger men weren’t done with war.  In the War of 1812, they again found their new homeland in the midst of American and British conflict.  Then, forty years later, the Angers of Bertie literally found themselves in the midst of battle.  In the 1866 Battle of Ridgeway, part of the Fenian Raids in Upper Canada, the Anger homestead was smack Watercolour of Battle of Ridgeway, Alexander Von Erichsen Ft. Erie Museumin the midst of the battlelines.  Bullet holes are still visible in the bricks.  The house was turned into a field hospital, being handy to the wounded.

Several years ago, Jim and I made a trip to Ridgeway to find the family.  First stop was the Ridgeway archives and library.

Ridgeway Cemeteries

The librarian told me that my great-great-great-great-grandparents were buried in the “Coloured Cemetery,” north of Ridgeway near the Anger house.  Close to the American border, the area had become home to escaped and freed slaves.  But just when I was thinking, with delight, about what the Anger place of burial meant for my personal ancestry, the Anger family name - gravestones in Ridgeway, photo Jim Stewartarchivist told me it had been the cemetery for everybody in the early days of the settlement.  White people, generally, had gravestones.  Black people had wooden crosses.  The Angers have gravestones.

All the cemeteries near Ridgeway have Angers buried in them.  But several of the children of George Frederick’s son John Charles moved west.  One of them, also named John Charles, had a son Peter who moved to Hazen Settlement in South Walsingham Township, Norfolk County.  It is from him that all of us here in Elgin County claim descent. (See my Anger family tree.)

This is for my father, George, who died nine years ago today.  He had seen his family history in computer printouts first by my cousin Chris Anger and then by me.  Dad and I also came to agree that the family was German and French.  The title for this is from his saying about our family name – “Anger by name, Anger by nature.”