Tag Archives: rural mail

Murel Anger, Mail Carrier

In 1972 my mother wrote this Dorchester Signpost article about her mother-in-law’s retirement from rural mail delivery. Mom was the weekly’s Belmont reporter. She put it in her scrapbook with a photo of Grandma and two siblings. From left is sister Bernice with husband Ray Alward, Murel Anger (in curtain camo), brother George Mabee and wife Nancy (Rice).

1972 Dorchester Signpost on mail carrier retirementHappy retirement to Mrs. Anger

Dorchester Signpost, Belmont News – Ruby Anger, Jan. 1972

We’re sure the residents of R R 2 Belmont have missed a familiar face these past three weeks. The woman who has become almost a tradition in that area has decided to call it quits. In a word, Mrs. Anger has retired from the mail route.

She and her late husband, Austin, started to carry mail in May 1946, before many of her present patrons were born. Mr. Anger did the route alone for a number of years with his wife helping him whenever she was needed. In later years it was a combined effort until Mr. Anger suffered a stroke and was hospitalized from May 1969 to the time of his death in August 1970. Mrs. Anger with her assistant, Mrs. Verna Legg have continued their daily route until Mrs. Anger decided to retire Jan. 10th. Mrs. Legg and her father Mr. J. D. Meikle are wished well as they continue to serve the R. R. 2 residents. But Mrs. Anger will certainly be missed after twenty-six years. She is wished a healthy, happy retirement by all.

First time on mail route

And now for a personal note. As much as we try to be impersonal in this column there are times we just can’t refrain. When I think of this mail route I think of my first time around it or should I say, partial trip. My husband had taken on a milk route in this area which made it necessary for us to move here from Tillsonburg. He had moved our furniture into the Frank Moore farm house on the 5th Conc. of North Dorchester. When I arrived later with small son and daughter, we went to my husband’s parents’ home. Mr. Anger drew the mail then in June 1947, assisted by his wife, my mother-in-law.

The next day my children and I rode around the route, up one road and down the other, before we eventually were told our new home was in sight. I thought we’d never get there! Not knowing what was done I was worried about getting settled as my husband worked away until late. My mother-in-law coaxed Mr. Anger to help me set up beds, etc. and he pretended to be too busy, but went in under protest. Everything was placed and ready to live in – what a surprise! He thought that was a big joke.

Frank Moore and family

That was the first time I met the Frank Moore family who turned out to be the best neighbours and landlord anyone could find. Especially for a town girl who had never lived in the country before. It was nice to know the mail car was coming through every day, too, with my dear parents-in-law aboard if I needed them.

Although I never lived on their farm, Frank and Evelyn Moore made a big impression on me as they also did on my mother. In Barn Cats I wrote a bit about them.