Tag Archives: Tyrone Dobbs

Corrie Street 31 Dec. 2017

Chords of Melodrama

Tuesday the trampoline in Fiz and Tyrone’s back yard burns. Who did it? Had to be Beth, says Fiz. No, Liz gives Beth an alibi. So Fiz wonders, “what if somebody’s trying to scare us?”fiz-what-if-someone-is-trying-to-scare-us

Only a complete headcase would do that, Tyrone laughs. Fiz sees it! I  hear organ chords – the sound of old soap opera. That foreboding sound that signals the reveal of evil. It’s Kirsty! Tyrone’s ex, a headcase wreaking madness and mayhem.tyrone-complete-head-case

The organ thundered again in my head. It was warning me, I think, that Coronation Street is indeed crashing further down the dramatic scale to pure melodrama.

And thus the week began and ended. Contrived stupidity, dastardly deeds. Michelle’s ‘robbery’ of her own business. Kate and Rana sneaking around, asking to get caught. People overhearing incriminating conversations. Secrets shared in public places. Anna returning to the scene of the crime. Phelan lurking and smirking.

On Fiz’s accusations, not once did she wonder if either daughter (users of said trampoline) might have had a lighter or matches. And yes, indeed, after she and Tyrone had major ‘my daughter, your daughter’ fights, Fiz finds a lighter in Ruby’s stuff.fiz thinks and organ chords sound

Some stories don’t need resolving. Kirsty is one. The car accident of Susan Barlow is another. They are sufficiently finished.

And my wish for 2018? Being able to pick a scene of the week that I actually like. It wasn’t that long ago that I could. Can we go back or move on from this melodrama fest? Please, no more plots that conjure up the sound of crashing organ chords.

Corrie Street 16 Oct 2016

Celebrity

Funny how the timing of fiction sometimes perfectly matches reality. Celebrity – its connotations and effects – has been all over the news celebrity pic tim-takes-selfie-with-tommythe past week. And then, on our Canadian screens on Friday, it comes to Coronation Street.

Steve, Tim and Tyrone nearly swoon when they meet Weatherfield County footballer Tommy Orpington at the Rovers. He is there to meet with Michelle about his wedding. They happen to be there when he walks through from the back.

play-sheet-by-tim“Happen to be there,” after spending the day planning how to do that, by accident. Tim even worked out a play sheet on where to stand so that they would accidentally bump into him.

Their mouths hang open when they see him. They can barely reply when he says hello and introduces himself. Then they follow him like ducklings, eyes like huge saucers. He takes it in stride, he’s used to it.tim-steve-and-tommy

Probably the actors knew how to do the look of starstruck fans because they would see it on the faces of people who meet them in real life. The only thing that struck me as unrealistic was that everybody else in the bar wasn’t crowded around Tommy too or at least gawking more openly.

As for Michelle, Fiz and Audrey staying back from the cluster of men tyrone-leaps-from-the-tablearound Tommy, yes, I can see that. Michelle is trying to be professional in her business dealings with him. And although she’s not likely to say it, she believes fawning attention should be on her. Fiz appears to be struggling to deal with the fact that Tyrone slipped his leash. Instead of choosing to sit with her sipping his drink and discussing whatever, he took off like a shot to meet his hero. And Audrey? She’s just sitting back, enjoying the scenery, I think.women-watch-huddle-around-tommy

I googled Tommy Orpington to see if he is a real soccer player. He’s not. He’s actor Matt Milburn, formerly of Emmerdale. I’m surprised they didn’t get a real footballer to make a guest appearance. tyrone-stares-at-tommyCelebrity cameos work well for the celebrity and the show, usually. They can come back to bite you if you don’t watch yourself. Donald Trump and Billy Bush found that out last week.

Still, the fictional star footballer Tommy Orpington has made me a fan of the fictional Weatherfield County team.

hilda-coronationstreet-wikia-com_wiki_muralIn sad real life, Jean Alexander died Friday at the age of 90. She was for many years the incomparable Hilda Ogden. The rollers in her hair and the flying ducks on the “muriel” on her wall will never be forgotten. (A Guardian tribute)

In sad Corrie life, I was wrong last week about Maria’s reaction to Ozzy’s death. She and all did it beautifully. We will miss you, Ozzy,

Corrie Street Jan. 10/16

Christmas Again

Corrie Christmas with people-coming-out-on-streetIt was like having another Christmas this week, the perfect one you dream of. Sleighbells ring, snow is glistening. It was way better than visiting Santa’s village in Lapland. It was seeing the magic at home in your community, brought to you by your friends and family. And that, Tyrone, is the true value of Christmas.

There was sadness – the reason for the street extravaganza – Hope’s tyrone-asks-ches-and-kirk-about-motorillness. There was impatience, thwarted plans and ingratitude. Mechanical problems meant lights and the snow maker didn’t work on Christmas Eve. Tyrone snapped at the elves. But they recognized that he had a bigger sadness, the likelihood that Hope would not be able to come home, that she wouldn’t see any of it anyway.

fiz-and-hope home Christmas EveThen the beautiful moment: Hope walked around the corner with Fiz and saw the display. Her face lit up. The lights weren’t on, the decorations weren’t all in place, there was no snow. But it didn’t matter to her. It was her Lapland. And so it was Tyrone’s too.

santa-arrivesAll the people of Weatherfield got a beautiful present on Christmas morning, snow. The elves continued to work. Carollers and a brass band. Trees all lit up. Hot chocolate and mince tarts. And Santa and his reindeer.

mary-rita-and-emily-open-giftsIn the houses, gifts were opened and turkey dinners ate. There were squabbles too, overt ones and hidden tensions. At night, residents gathered at the Rovers. And there was a fight. What would Christmas Day be without somebody obliging us with a good fight?

Corrie Christmas Carollers

Corrie Christmas everyone on street-at-nightOn the street, people sauntered along and joined in with the carollers. Another lovely moment, part of the storyline for Hope and for us in tv-land, passersby looking up to the top floor window of Tyrone and Fiz’s house.

fiz-hope-and-tyrone-at-windowThey were upstairs in the girls’ bedroom, looking out at the winter wonderland. Fiz was appreciating what Tyrone had done for their daughters, and Tyrone was appreciating what their neighbours had done for all of them.

ches-and-sinead-waveDown below, those neighbours smiled and waved Merry Christmas up to her. And the camera angle put us in Hope’s place. Merry Christmas, Coronation Street, I said to the television.

For a lovely discussion of the Corrie Christmas episodes, see Emma Hynes’ post on Bluenose Corrie Blogger.

Corrie Street Sept. 6/15

Scout Leader Dougie

After the introduction of Dougie last week, I looked forward to the Dougie says there is a stream with troutcamping trip in the wilds of Wales. He is Lord Baden-Powell’s Scouting for Boys manual personified. With him having a group of townies to teach about the great outdoors, this camping trip was going to be great fun.

Great if you’re watching from a safe distance, that is. Dougie is one of those people I pray to never have to go near in real life. But watching other people deal with him? Wonderful!

Able to make fire by rubbing a stick, making bunny burgers from a making-firerabbit he caught in a trap he made with a pointy stick, having plasters in his pocket in case of wood whittling accidents, Dougie is prepared. A full-blown love of his “mistress” Nature and the knowledge to survive and enjoy all things she can throw at you – that is what Dougie wants to share with everyone. I kept expecting him to break into song – Edelweiss maybe, or Springtime for Hitler.

Scout Dougie and SineadBy the time they were well into their extreme wilderness camping excursion with Dougie, I wasn’t the only one for whom he evoked aspects of the Third Reich. Off on his own in the woods, Chesney wanted only to escape “Mein Führer” as he called him. Even Sinead admitted that she had tired of “Mr. Know-it-all.”

Dougie points out death cap mushroomDougie went way too far with his ridiculing of Tyrone over everything. He ceased being entertaining, and became simply a bully. At the end of the week, and the end of the trip, his daughter forced him to back off at least toward her and Craig.

Were Dougie and Caitlin simply a camping trip interlude? It would have been a pretty boring vacation for the campers and audience if lovely-crispsthey hadn’t met anyone new. An opening was made for their reappearance on the Street, with Craig and Caitlin’s promise to stay in touch. Do we need more new people? Much as I like them both, I don’t think so.

Coronation Street Scene of the Week (Feb. 10/13)

Open to Persuasion

A Joan Armatrading song mentioned by Jenna this week applies to three characters in two different storylines:  “I’m not in love but I’m open to persuasion.”  Jenna and Lloyd in one, Kirsty and Tyrone in the other.  Four actors, two great scenes.

beat-a-confession-outKirsty and Tyrone talk after she returns to Number 9 from the wedding that didn’t happen.  Tyrone desperately tries to smooth things over so that she will stay or agree to let him keep Ruby.  Kirsty isn’t buying any of it.  She is angry but also hurt.  She wants to tell him how it is going to be, but she also wants to explain herself to him.  It is both a huge fight and a cathartic opening up of her history and emotions.

For the first time that I can recall, she gives details about her dad kirsty talks about childhoodhitting her and her mother covering it up.  When a child, she had asked her father if they could have a dog and a broken collarbone was her answer.  At the hospital, her mother told the doctor she had fallen off her bicycle:  “kids, eh!” she laughed.

Tyrone listens to Kirsty without interrupting.  It seems he, like me, is visualizing the little girl hurt by one parent and betrayed by the other.  All because she wanted a dog.  Tyrone is a dog person and I wonder if, like me, he’s thinking thank heavens they didn’t get one to be yet another victim for daddy.

top-of-stairsBut Tyrone returns to his immediate concern – who will have Ruby.  Kirsty, daddy’s girl after all, raises her fists to him as she tells him Ruby will be with her.

Paul-with-Kirsty-bottom-of-stairsThey push past each other to get upstairs to the baby.  At the top of the stairs, Tyrone ducks a punch from Kirsty. She keeps on going, all the way to the bottom.  High drama resumes.

Jenna’s persuasion

Lloyd arranging an opportunity for a heart-to-heart with Jenna breaks the ‘high drama’ be-anything-moreof Sally carping at Jenna about taking advantage of her innocent little Sophie.  As they decide what kind of take-out they want, he gently presses her about whether she has romantic feelings for Sophie or women in general.  She doesn’t answer directly but we and Lloyd accept her words as a yes.  And no, she never felt she could tell her mother or especially her father.  Lloyd questions this, saying her father was an open-minded man.  She says that her dad never again never-played-it-again jenna open to persuasionplayed one of his favourite songs after he heard that the singer was gay.

It was nice to see Jenna relax and open up.  I have liked her character but she always seems to be buttoned up with so much tension held in her neck and shoulders that she could benefit from physiotherapy herself.  Admittedly, she’s had reason to be tense with finding out her late father wasn’t really her dad and he knew it. That Lloyd is her biological dad and now is back with her mother.  On remember-that-songtop of that, Sophie, a teenager, has been throwing herself at her, as did Sophie’s dad.  And she doesn’t want to out herself.

not-marrying-me-becauseSo Jenna might persuade herself to love Sophie.  Tyrone tried to persuade Kirsty he was in love with her and Kirsty desperately wants to believe she is loved.

Coronation Street Scene of the Week (Feb. 3/13)

Teleflorist

My husband’s guess was that Kirsty would show up at her wedding with a hidden gun.  kirsty-in-dressAfter seeing her wedding dress, I asked where would she hide it?  I never thought about her bouquet as a hiding spot, and neither of us thought Tyrone’s secret cell phone would be what she hid in it.

Very clever is our Kirsty.  By reciting off some of Tyrone’s texts to Fiz, it’s Tyrone who looks bad here, not bat-crazy Kirsty.  It was an absolutely insane plan that Fiz came up with, made even more insane by Tyrone’s planned execution of it.

cell phone in kirsty's handFiz consulted a lawyer who told her Tyrone could establish parental rights by marrying the child’s mother.  But I feel there must have been a “however” in there that she missed.

Legal Opinions

Indeed, some UK lawyers have given their opinions online: there are kirsty on phone in churchother ways he could gain parental responsibility.  These options, and DNA testing, were mentioned in passing earlier in the story but haven’t been dealt with in a satisfactory fashion for most fans.

I could find nothing to show whether Tyrone’s plan to depart straight from his own wedding reception with the baby and Fiz would be kirsty and tyrone at altarlegally tenable for him to claim custody.  But it makes no common sense to me.  He would have not established even a legally binding marital relationship with Kirsty.

So, in following the real-life logic of this plotline, there are huge holes.  But it has been riveting due to the domestic abuse story content and the acting by both principals.  When the cell phone was kirsty reacts to textsfound in the couch and Kirsty realized what it was, it was impossible to not feel sorry for her as her dreams crashed around her.  Even though we feared what she would do next, the emotional devastation she felt was so real.

Natalie Gumede has successfully conveyed a woman on the edge; trying to control the violence in herself that she hates so much, hoping that she can change her behaviour, hoping that they can truly be the happy family textthat she has wanted for so long.  Then seeing the texts laying out the whole of Tyrone’s betrayal of the dream and what had appeared to be the reality.  And betraying her and the life she and Tyrone had with the woman Kirsty for so long has seen as a threat. Despite knowing that Tyrone has good reason for what he’s doing, my heart still ached for Kirsty.

Coronation Street Scene of the Week (Sept. 9/12)

Love Hurts

It’s the story of Kirsty and Tyrone I guess, more than any one scene this week.  Although Kirsty listens to Tyroneevery scene where Kirsty gets or might get annoyed or has an implement of any kind in or near her hand is scary.  After her return, that meant pretty much every scene she was in.  And Tyrone, desperate for love and a baby, willing to sacrifice himself, his friendships – everything to keep a madwoman happy.

On Friday, two scenes that happened after Kirsty found out Tina and Tommy knew about the way she vents her stress illustrate both points.  Tyrone walked in the house and Tyrone looks at iron and goes no nearer KirstyKirsty was there ironing clothes.  He looked at the hot steam iron more often than he looked at her.  So did I.  He made a move once toward her, as if to hug her, but stopped short at the sight of the hot iron between them.  I’m sure he was more relieved than I was when she unplugged it and put it away.

Next scene, over a meal, she once again says she’s willing to get help. But she can’t bear the fact that anyone else knows about what she does.  That she loves him but it won’t work, Tyrone and Kirsty talk over takeout mealblahblahblah.  Not with Tina and Tommy knowing and watching her every move.  And Tyrone once again falls into her trap.  He says that he will totally cut off contact with Tina and Tyrone, anything to make her happy and let him have his little family.  And you can see the self-satisfied glint come into her perhaps truly remorseful eyes.  If he does it, she’ll have total control over him.  And she seems to need that.

This is an excellent storyline remarkably well done by Alan Halsall and Natalie Gumede.  steam rising from iron in Kirsty's handThey beautifully portray the complexities of two people who want to love and be loved but have some self- (and other-) destructive issues that neither want to actually deal with.  The thought of a baby being added to this mix is horrifying.

Kirsty blames her dad

I missed the episodes when Kirsty’s parents were there and she explained that her dad beat her and her mother.  Maybe I’d feel more Tommy confronts Kirsty about taking her work home with hersympathy for her if I had seen those.  As it is, I see only the pride that is keeping her from getting help that she knows she needs.  I am relieved that she is no longer a cop. Interestingly, Tommy is the only one who has explicitly connected the dots about that and her being abusive.  She is a bully and that’s not what any police force needs on the streets.

And it’s not what Tyrone needs.  In the final scene of the week, Tyrone cut his friends Tyrone walks past Tina and Tommy on streetdead, told Tommy he only wanted to see him with the loan repayment and for them both to stay away from him.  I wonder what it’s going to take for him to think, if not of his safety and sanity, but of the protection of the baby that is soon to arrive.  If Kirsty wants to blame her father for what she is doing, Tyrone ought to remember that her dad beat both his wife and his child.

Coronation Street Scene of the Week (Jul 29/12)

Home Décor

It was a splendid week on Corrie Street.  The Jubilee festivities were just grand, with the Sitting for meal at Jubilee street partybunting and flags and pictures of Queen Elizabeth.  The Street party was wonderful, as were the costumes of 60 years of pop singers.  I’m glad Steve told us he was dressed as John Lennon.  My guess was Elton John or John Denver.  Eva and Sunita – I guess if you’ve got it, flaunt it!  And they did, I say, they did.

Dennis and Rita’s wedding lead-up was great.  Exciting.  Was she going to get to the Dennis and Rita are pronounced husband and wifechurch on time or at all?  But she did and the bad guys were caught and Kirsty and Tina reached an understanding if not friendship.  The wedding itself was lovely.  I got a tear in my eye when they said their vows.

Tyrone’s living room

Tyrone and Kirsty and living room wall - home décor
It was a week of great scenes in storylines and visuals. But the showstopper for me was this shot of Tyrone’s living room.  How could anyone spend time in that room and keep their sanity!  It was bad enough when Vera and Jack put that nightmarish dark wallpaper up.  The only good thing I could Kirsty beside huge flower printsee about Kirsty moving in was that she would replace it.  But no, they’ve added “elements” to it.  I wished they’d just pan the camera around slowly so I could see it all, but I was afraid it would burn my retinas if they had.

As a MINI person, I did love the Jubilee commemorative flag with a shiny MINI in the Jubilee MINI postermiddle of it.  I don’t understand it.  2012 is Mini’s 55th anniversary.  I want one.  Maybe it’s just part of what all British or British-connected companies did this year in issuing Jubilee editions or commemorative stuff.  I really want one.  I just wouldn’t put it on an already overloaded living room wall.

Ogdens with the 2nd wall mural and plaster ducksThe history of tacky décor is a long and honourable one on Corrie Street. It reached its finest moment with Hilda Ogden’s wallpaper “muriel” and the plaster ducks.

The Duckworths climbed new heights of exterior tackiness with the stone cladding, followed by “The Old Rectory” name Jack Duckworth outside front doorplaque.  Then, presumably wanting to surround themselves fully in the experience of hideousness, inside and out, they put up the wallpaper.

Vera would be proud of what Tyrone and Kirsty have done.  And I guess I can take solace in the thought that, as long as that wallpaper stays up, a bit of Vera and Jack will always be with us.

Geoffrey Hughes as Onslow on Keeping Up AppearancesIn real life sad news, actor Geoffrey Hughes passed away last Friday.  He played Eddie Yeats, the Ogden’s lodger and the source for the ‘muriel’, on Coronation Street and Onslow, the bane of Hyacinthe’s existence, on Keeping Up Appearances.

Coronation Street Scene of the Week (Dec. 18/11)

Paradise Lost

Dreams seemingly attained: Paradise found.  Awakening to reality: Paradise lost.  Three scenes this week showed this, in very different ways with different levels of drama.

Tyrone loses

Tyrone at Webster houseTuesday, Tyrone going to see Kevin, telling him that it was taking too much of a toll to keep fighting him, keep hating him.  It was doing more damage to him, Tyrone, than Kevin was worth.  Let’s get along as work partners.  But I’ll never be your mate.  Wise words from Tyrone.

He’d had more than he ever imagined Tyronepossible:  a home, wife, child, his own business co-owned with his best mate.  That mate, Kevin, destroyed Tyrone’s paradise.  Now Tyrone has the guilt of his anger almost causing Kevin’s death.  You can be justified in despising someone for their actions, but you will pay just as high a price as they will.  The disappointment and rancour hurts you as much as their actions have.

Becky’s children

Then Friday, Becky seeing her dream walk away.  Max, taken back into care, while social workers sort out the mess caused by Kylie putting a For Sale sign on a child and Becky says goodbye to MaxBecky and Steve meeting her price.  Becky has had to deal with Tracey pretending to be a responsible parent of Steve’s child.  She’s had to deal with Steve believing Tracey and being worried about being a good father.  She has had to deal with Steve making it clear that Amy is his child, not Becky’s, and that Max, whatever he is to Steve, is Becky’s concern.  She’s had Tracey threatening to take Amy away, and is trying to cope with her own grief over that as well as Steve’s.  While Steve continued to push her away:  ‘like it matters to you’ type statements.

But she’s still got Max, until Steve takes a gamble on getting Child Services involved.  Becky packs up toy train setTell the truth, he thinks, then no one can blackmail anyone.  Good in theory, but David decides to do the same thing.  None of them win, especially not Max.  He’s uprooted again and sent to a foster home.  I only hope it’s the same one he was in before.  Poor little child, poor Becky.

An English teacher

The unraveling of John Stape.  Fiz finding out what he’s been doing and where Ches has been.  The rescue after John takes off from the Hoyles’ basement.  The camera work was great, showing him Fizz holding Hope in baby roomscurrying down the ginnel to his back door.  Maria screams, police arrive. John is gone.  Out the back, Maria says.

The final moments when Fiz sends Ches home to Katie and carefully locks and bolts the door.  You know then that John is in the house.  But where?  I never thought of the attic, and don’t know how he got from the back yard upstairs.  But my blood ran cold when the camera moved upward from Fiz Paradise Lost - John in attic reading Miltonsleeping in her bed to John, above in the attic, reading Milton’s Paradise Lost.

All of this happened because he wanted to teach again.  All he ever wanted to do was be an English teacher.

Coronation Street Scene of the Week (July 3/11)

Family Trees

Two scenes this week – couldn’t choose between them.  Very different stories, but both about expanding the family tree.

We’ve got a new shoot on the Dobbs lineage, but daddy Tyrone doesn’t yet know that it was likely a graft.

Molly about to give birth, Kevin and Sally thereMolly hanging on, wanting Tyrone to be there before she went to the hospital and before she gave birth.  The people she most didn’t want there – Kevin and Sally – were.  Sally was trying to keep her from having the baby on the spot, in the living room.  Kevin was looking like he’d rather be anywhere than where he was.  Molly was throwing dagger looks at him and snarky comments.  Sally, for once, was just trying to help.

I was thinking who is this situation worse for – Molly or Sally?  In the moment, it’s gotta be Molly.  Having probably Kevin’s baby, while Kevin’s wife is acting as her midwife and Kevin himself is there in the room with you and her.

Jack and Connie with baby JackBut when the truth comes out, about Kevin and Molly’s affair, what is that going to be like for Sally?  Realizing she helped deliver her husband’s child.  I think that’s much worse, realizing you’ve been betrayed and that you, willingly and unwittingly, aided and comforted your betrayer.

And the coda to this scene, the lovely moment that brought tears to my eyes was Jack Duckworth holding the baby, and hearing that he’d be named Jack Dobbs.  The look on Jack’s face.  And that lucky baby:  he has the best granddad and dad in the world, even if both of them are social kin rather than biological.

Barlow Oak Tree

Peter Barlow meeting new family in RoversThe other scene involving lineage:  the ever-expanding branches of the Ken Barlow “oak tree” as Peter called his dad.  Seeing Ken’s son Lawrence and grandson James together with Ken was wonderful.  In the story it was great, but even greater knowing that both characters are played by Bill Roache’s real life sons.  That too made my eyes misty.  A show where an original character, first portrayed by a young man of 21 or something, now can show three generations with that actor’s own grown-up family.  I think that’s just fabulous for the Roache family and the Coronation Street family, both production and viewer.

Ken and father at table, 1st ep.In terms of the storyline, they’re also harking back to the origins of the Street – its characterizations and literary references.  We met Ken in conflict with his father over beliefs and values.  Their clash was over social class, and yes, Susan, mother of Lawrence was involved.  Fifty years later, Ken is trying to arbitrate between his son and grandson in their clash in values and ways of life.  Their clash is over sexual orientation.  The scene of them sitting Ken, son and grandson at tablearound Lawrence’s kitchen table arguing about change and social norms is a kind of upscale version of the “kitchen sink realism” of Britain in the 1950s and 1960s, a dramatic form and era that influenced Coronation Street.  And I could almost hear Neil Young’s anthem from the next era, “Old man, look at my life.  I’m a lot like you were.”