Tag Archives: eggs

Egg Foo Young

egg foo young photo-d-stewart.Not much in the fridge but eggs and bok choy. Egg foo young, maybe? No, you need bean sprouts, the Joy of Cooking and online recipes told me.

Can I adapt it? More creative googling and voilà. Here’s the Joy recipe with my changes in italics, as well as an egg foo young gravy recipe I found on mommymusings.

Egg Foo Young

Clean or drain 2 cups bean sprouts
(I julienned bok choy stems into narrow strips about 2 inches long. Added green parts too, but in larger pieces)

Heat a little vegetable oil in wok or skillet and stirfry until translucent and crisp:

  • 1 minced slice gingerroot,
  • 6 chopped green onions,
  • 1 rib celery, thinly sliced

egg-foo-young-makings-photo-d-stewart(I used chopped bok choy, red and green peppers, leeks, sliced water chestnuts.)

  • 1 cup chopped cooked fish, shrimp or finely diced cooked meat
    (I used whole shrimp, stirfried them lightly, then peeled them.)

egg-mixture-photo-d-stewartHave ready and combine the above ingredients and sprouts with:

  • 6 well-beaten eggs,
  • 1 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp pepper

Heat an additional 1 tbsp vegetable oil in another small skillet or wok.

Drop the above mixture into it to form small omelettes, golden brown on both sides. Serve with soy sauce.

Joy of Cooking, Plume 1997 ed.

I did the omelettes one by one, flipping them as best I could. Then, after putting them on the plates, I spooned gravy over them.

Egg Foo Young Gravy

1 cup beef or chicken stock
1 tbsp cornstarch (I mixed it with a bit of cold water first)
1 tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp sesame oil
1 tsp sugar

Mix all together. Cook for a couple minutes until it thickens. Spoon on top of your omelettes.

Phoenix Eggs

phoenix eggs in cartonThese beautiful little eggs are from my great nephew’s Phoenix hens. They’re maybe half the size of a large supermarket egg. But they’re twice as flavourful. I think that has more to do with the fact that the hens live a normal chicken life instead of being in a small cage in a battery chicken farm. These hens live in an outdoor coop with a run so they can move and peck and do normal chicken things.

boy holding Phoenix henI’ve seen hens like this at chicken shows but never in a backyard coop. That’s because they are considered show birds not laying birds. I asked why they didn’t have a rooster. The answer was that the roosters have enormously long tails and they’d have to build an extension to the coop to accommodate him. And yes, what I read online is that you do need extra tall perches for the roosters.

It’s from Phoenix rooster and henthe length of the tail feathers that the breed was given its name. The roosters look like the Phoenix bird of myth. The hens, at least those with this plumage, to me look like they’re wearing necklaces. That’s what I’ve always called them, the necklace hens.

Phoenix Eggs in Fried Rice

broken eggs in dish photo d stewartGoogling them, I read they’re not prolific layers. But these five hens usually each give an egg almost every day. What more could you ask for? And they’re perfect eggs: good hard shells, deep yellow yolk and lovely taste.

I scrambled three eggs, cooking them until they had just set, then put them aside on a small plate.

eggs, broccoli and riceI stirfried some broccoli, then added leftover cooked rice to heat through. Lastly I put in the cooked eggs and lightly mixed it all together until heated. The eggs turned leftovers into a whole new, and delicious, meal.

egg fried riceWhen I get a chicken coop built, some Phoenix hens will be living in it. I read that they aren’t noted as particularly friendly, but the ones I met were. Came right up to me and let me scratch their heads and pet their feathers. No running away or pecking at me, just inquisitive and friendly little birds. Little birds who lay lovely eggs!

Pickled Eggs

pickled eggs (from getcracking.ca)My sister told me an easy way to make pickled eggs. She uses a large jar with a regular style lid because they go through them quickly. If you figure you’ll have yours longer, probably best to use a jar with a sealer lid. You can make larger or smaller quantities, just adjust your ingredients accordingly.

How to make

Hardboil 12 eggs. Peel and prick all around with fork. Half fill a sterilized jar (1 qt or litre size) with white vinegar, 1 tbsp salt, 2 tbsp sugar. Shake to dissolve. Add eggs, and add vinegar to fill jar to top. Put lid on and let sit a week.

The photo came from Get Cracking, where you can get lots of egg recipes and information.

Zucchini Biscuit Quiche

biscuit quiche with saladThis kind-of quiche is a really easy, fast and light meal. Once, when a friend was visiting, we were talking and I had the veggies sliced, everything mixed and the dish in the oven before she even realized I’d started preparing dinner. 

You can make it with broccoli, mushrooms, tomatoes – anything you might have and think would go in a quiche. I’ve used many different kinds of cheese in it as well – again whatever I have on hand. (The one in the pictures is mushroom and broccoli with cheddar and parmesan.)

Just use the same quantities of veggies and cheese. And don’t be frightened by the amount of oil – you need it to keep it moist and fluffy. Serve it with a salad and it’s a perfect summer meal.

How to make:

3 cup zucchini, thinly sliced

1 small onion, chopped

1 cup biscuit mix (Bisquick or any baking powder tea biscuit mix)

4 large eggs

mushroom & broccoli quiche, in casserole dish1/2 cup vegetable oil

1/2 cup each grated Parmesan cheese and grated Gruyere cheese (or others)

1/4 tsp each salt and pepper

1/2 tsp dried marjoram

2 sprigs fresh parsley, chopped

Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Pour into a greased 12” x 8” casserole dish [I use an 8” x 8”]. Bake at 350˚ for 30 mins or until golden. Serves 8 [as side dish, 3-4 if main course].

Source: M. A. Downie & B. Robertson, Canadian Treasury of Cooking and Gardening, Toronto: Key Porter Books 1987